Re: Sinhala numerals

From: John Hudson (john@tiro.ca)
Date: Thu Dec 28 2006 - 22:31:53 CST

  • Next message: Raymond Mercier: "Re: Sinhala numerals"

    Michael Everson wrote:

    > Sinhala experts (from Sri Lanka) said they did not know them, and the
    > evidence we had was insifficient to warrant encoding them. I would be
    > delighted to give my dream form and propose to encode them... but have
    > never found more evidence than one plate and the description at 130 in
    > Gunasekara 1891. He says:

    > "The Sinhalese had symbols of its own to present the different numerals,
    > which were in use until the betinning of the present [19th] century.
    > Arabic figures are now univerally used. For the benefit of the student
    > the old symbols are given in the plate opposite. (No. III)."

    > On that plate are unique symbols for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 20,
    > 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 (looks like a ligature of 60 and 10), 80, 90, 100, 1000.

    Michael, have you checked to see if there is any mention of these numbers in Georges
    Ifrah's _The Universal History of Numbers_? I have found this book quite useful in terms
    of information on historical numeric systems. Of course, Ifrah might simply repeat
    information from Gunasekara...

    John Hudson

    -- 
    Tiro Typeworks        www.tiro.com
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